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Posts tagged ‘multiple offers’

17
Apr

It’s Offer Night in the Big City

negotiate blogMastermind at my office is always a lot of fun and as the office expands and matures the topics tend to get a bit more technical in nature. That creates a challenge for some of the newer agents whose eyes start to glaze over. So every once in a while I have to reign in the conversation and steer it back to day-to-day operational questions. Like what happens on multiple offer night.

One the policies that we have at Bosley Real Estate is that if an agent gets an offer on his own property AND is in multiple offers, one of the managers ( in this case, me) steps in to represent the Seller. In an era where offers can be signed back multiple times, this is the third best way to handle a situation like this. The first of course, is to categorically refuse to represent a buyer, either as a client or customer, in the transaction. The second is to clearly state that you operate on the “one shot rule” so bring your best offer and be prepared to lose by one dollar. But in our system the listing agent presents first then leaves the premises and has no way to know what other offers are. If the seller wants to send all the offers back, the listing agent has no advantage over any other agent thus guaranteeing that everyone remains on an equal playing field. Everyone is treated fairly.

Last week I was called in to manage an offer situation and the result of that process provided a great topic for the following day’s mastermind session and highlights some of the issues that managers need to remind agents about.

So let me set the stage. The sellers come to my office and settle in to our large boardroom. We wait while the other agents arrive. There are supposed to be six in total including the listing agent and another agent from my office plus four agents from other competitor offices. All six have registered their offers through the front desk. So we begin. The listing agent presents first. She brings in four copies of her offer. One for each of the two sellers, one for me and one for herself to refer to. The next Bosley agent presents, with three signed copies. The next agent presents with one copy of his offer which I review with the two sellers straining awkwardly to follow along. The next agent also presents with one copy of the offer but as soon as I turn the page I realize that the buyers have not signed the signature page. The next agent also only has one copy but is missing our schedule A. The final agent doesn’t show up or call.

So with six registered offers only four bring the required and properly executed paperwork, two bring enough copies to go around, one misses essential signatures, one misses the required schedule and one doesn’t even show up. Not good. Despite the efforts, or perhaps because of the efforts of all the agents, the house sells well over the asking price, but it highlights two critical aspects of the offer presentation. First, it is essential to have enough copies to go around. I think that we often miss this critical step in the heat of the moment. There will be a time in the not-so-distant future when we will be using our tablets to conduct the sale but for now agents should provide multiple copies if only to be polite to all the parties in the room. Second, while you have every right to revoke your offer before the presentation, it is important to follow the necessary protocols. An agent must, at the very least, inform the listing brokerage that they will not be presenting. Sometimes it’s the little things that go along way to a successful transaction with the added benefit of staying out of RECO’s hair.

mark mclean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office and Director at Large for the Toronto Real Estate Board and is currently a candidate for TREB President Elect in the upcoming Spring election.

27
Jan

Do Market Conditions Trump Agent Relationships?

housing shortageToronto has a problem. For the past several months, or longer, there has been a shortage of freehold listings in the first-time and move-up markets. You will get different answers depending on who you talk to, but the main culprits include; low-interest rates, the Land Transfer Tax, tighter government regulations and higher consumer debt. The real answer is probably E, all of the above. Unfortunately for buyers the old saying rules…Desperate times call for desperate measures.
Recently one of our agents sold a condo for a young couple anxious to get into the housing market. Their goal was simple; parley their extraordinary talent for decorating and renovating. They did it to their condo and now wanted to do it with a house. Start small and slowly increase their net worth the old-fashioned way…buy a home with good bones, renovate and sell, then buy something bigger and do it all over again. It has been done successfully by many talented individuals over the years. But here is the problem. The couple in question have been watching the market for some time. They have heard the countless stories of wild bidding wars and are now convinced that the only way to win is by working with the listing agent. Their thought is that either they will get it at a lower price or at the very least get the inside advantage at offer night. The example given above should highlight a number of key concerns for both buyers and agents.
First lets look at the process from the buyer’s point of view. You go into an open house and see the home of your dreams. Well, lets clarify… the home of a lot of people’s dreams. So you ask the listing agent to represent you in purchasing the home. Now, aside from the obvious pitfall of asking them to represent both sides of a negotiation, you are signing a buyer representation agreement with the selling agent. It is important to understand what this means, otherwise you could find yourself in a situation where you owe two commissions. More to point however is that jumping from agent to agent will do you more harm than good. The simple fact is that you are hiring an agent to walk you through the process, negotiate on your behalf and in your best interests, keep confidential facts about your motivation to themselves, review competitive properties and help you determine an offering price, arrange and oversee things like home inspections and appraisal visits, and hook you up with contractors or movers and finally, provide a great deal of follow-up service. All these things are tough to do when your agent is also representing the seller especially when there are many people competing for the same home.
There are some basic mechanics about offer night that most buyers don’t know about either. First, if the selling agent is representing you, he must tell other buyer’s agents. He must also disclose if he is lowering commission. The point of this disclosure is to level the playing field for all buyers. That being said, some companies take great pains to ensure a fair and equitable process, so contracting the selling agent just doesn’t make sense if your motivation is to save money.
On the surface, contacting a listing agent seems like a no-brainer, but the reality is that a trusting relationship is the key to a successful home purchase in our competitive market.

mark mclean

23
Oct

What Does “Conditionally Sold” Really Mean?

mark it soldHappy Wednesday. Two interesting comments came out of today’s Mastermind centering around the conditionally sold status of properties, both worth mentioning here. In the first discussion, an agent had a client who was interested in a home that was recently sold conditionally on financing and a home inspection. The agent said that he had tried to book an appointment on the house despite its status and the listing agent had refused the request. He felt that the conditions would be met and the deal would firm up therefore showing the house would just be a waste of time. As it turns out, the deal firmed up BUT it should be noted that not every deal firms up. In fact, there was a time when deals, both conditional AND firm, fell apart all the time. It got me thinking about those unsteady deals… You know, the ones where the buyer asks for a couple of extensions on the conditions. Something doesn’t sit well. The buyer is simply buying time. What can you do? As an agent the job is simple. Pick up the phone and rustle up another offer. But wait, you can’t sell a house to two people. No problem. The second offer is conditional on the first deal falling apart. It’s worth the effort and as we move further ahead in our sales cycle, and see more conditional sales, you need to be prepared to entertain a different kind of “multiple offer”.
Here’s another one. An agent finds herself in multiple offers on a loft condo. Unfortunately the listing agent’s offer is accepted (big surprise). Ok, I will suspend judgement on how that happened, but what was surprising about this scenario is that seven days passed before the conditional deal was reported on TREB. Just so we are clear, TREB rules are pretty clear on this, conditional sales have to be reported (posted) within 48 hours. Yes, sometimes it takes a bit longer, like you’re waiting on a cheque, but 7 days? Checking with TREB’s DIS or Data Integrity Service, the fine, if convicted is a couple of hundred dollars. Let’s back up a second….I’ve got a lot listing, the phone is ringing off the hook, it’s sold fast but I can land a whole bunch more leads if I drag my feet on reporting it sold. I can hear the phone call now….”oh hi, yes that’s our listing. Well actually we just received an offer on that but as it turns out there is another one in building that we will be getting.” I only wish getting leads like that cost me $100.
It seems like this is just another trick of the trade we need to watch out for. FYI, I’ve got TREB on speed dial.

mark mclean

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