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January 27, 2014

Do Market Conditions Trump Agent Relationships?

by mark mclean

housing shortageToronto has a problem. For the past several months, or longer, there has been a shortage of freehold listings in the first-time and move-up markets. You will get different answers depending on who you talk to, but the main culprits include; low-interest rates, the Land Transfer Tax, tighter government regulations and higher consumer debt. The real answer is probably E, all of the above. Unfortunately for buyers the old saying rules…Desperate times call for desperate measures.
Recently one of our agents sold a condo for a young couple anxious to get into the housing market. Their goal was simple; parley their extraordinary talent for decorating and renovating. They did it to their condo and now wanted to do it with a house. Start small and slowly increase their net worth the old-fashioned way…buy a home with good bones, renovate and sell, then buy something bigger and do it all over again. It has been done successfully by many talented individuals over the years. But here is the problem. The couple in question have been watching the market for some time. They have heard the countless stories of wild bidding wars and are now convinced that the only way to win is by working with the listing agent. Their thought is that either they will get it at a lower price or at the very least get the inside advantage at offer night. The example given above should highlight a number of key concerns for both buyers and agents.
First lets look at the process from the buyer’s point of view. You go into an open house and see the home of your dreams. Well, lets clarify… the home of a lot of people’s dreams. So you ask the listing agent to represent you in purchasing the home. Now, aside from the obvious pitfall of asking them to represent both sides of a negotiation, you are signing a buyer representation agreement with the selling agent. It is important to understand what this means, otherwise you could find yourself in a situation where you owe two commissions. More to point however is that jumping from agent to agent will do you more harm than good. The simple fact is that you are hiring an agent to walk you through the process, negotiate on your behalf and in your best interests, keep confidential facts about your motivation to themselves, review competitive properties and help you determine an offering price, arrange and oversee things like home inspections and appraisal visits, and hook you up with contractors or movers and finally, provide a great deal of follow-up service. All these things are tough to do when your agent is also representing the seller especially when there are many people competing for the same home.
There are some basic mechanics about offer night that most buyers don’t know about either. First, if the selling agent is representing you, he must tell other buyer’s agents. He must also disclose if he is lowering commission. The point of this disclosure is to level the playing field for all buyers. That being said, some companies take great pains to ensure a fair and equitable process, so contracting the selling agent just doesn’t make sense if your motivation is to save money.
On the surface, contacting a listing agent seems like a no-brainer, but the reality is that a trusting relationship is the key to a successful home purchase in our competitive market.

mark mclean

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