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Posts tagged ‘multiple offers’

17
Nov

You Can’t Win Them All, But You Can Increase Your Odds

show-upNo question that frustration levels are high these days. The market is still very hot and competition on offer night is as strong as it has ever been. They used to say that you had to make fifty significant real estate related conversations to get one deal. Today that adage has been tweaked to say that you need to make one hundred connections for the CHANCE to get a deal.
Part of my job as manager is to help agents figure out strategies on winning BEFORE they present. I decided to use this topic as a focus for my Tuesday meeting. Having lots of brains in the room allowed us to work together to come up with ideas on how to improve your chances. Frankly some of them seem very obvious but you would be surprised how often even the simplest idea can lead to victory.
There are the basic winning strategies. Have a well prepared and clean offer, include a large deposit in form of a bank draft, and have your client nearby. These three items should be enough to get you across the finish line. But there are some that may be less obvious. The truth is that it is not always the person with the biggest bag of money who gets the house. On the contrary. A solid offer, with better terms and conditions can beat a higher price more often than you think.
Like a good detective, its important to find out as much as you possibly can about who the seller is, how experienced is their agent, who are you competing with. The answers to this questions may help you in determining your strategy and potential offering price. Also it is important to present well. That means not just looking good, but making sure names are correctly spelled on the offer and that you have multiple copies for each seller even if the eventual offer will be signed digitally. It seems like a silly thing to do but before you head to the offer table ask the listing agent who you will be presenting to. If it is a family of five making decisions for an estate, bring enough copies for everyone in the room.
Ultimately the perfect presentation should include building rapport not just with the listing agent but with the seller. Being understanding yet firm with a sharp mind on the market and comparable sold properties in the neighbourhood will endure you as a professional.
Another helpful hint. After the offer is typed, find yourself a quiet room with no distractions and go over the entire offer line by line. There is nothing worse that wrong clauses, inclusions or names. Many years ago I received an offer on a property from an agent who was obviously in a rush. In an effort to save time, this agent cut and pasted clauses from another offer. When it arrived to me it had the wrong address and seller’s name on one of the schedules, the written deposit amount didn’t match the numeric amount nor did it match the amount on the cheque. Sloppy mistakes like that can cost you a deal very easily and there is nothing worse that having to go back to your buyer and explain why their higher offer was not accepted.
As I said earlier, these tips won’t guarantee you will win but they will increase your odds dramatically. Have any other tips that have worked for you? I would love to hear them. Drop me note.
mark mclean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real estate Association . The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE

5
May

WTH!?! Your Client Walked Away Over That?!?!

broken microvaveI’m trying to be polite here. The “WTH” stands for ‘What the heck”. A few weeks ago at our Mastermind session we talked about how an agent lost a deal over a relatively small item. In this case it was a $500 Ikea cabinet. As soon as that story came out others piped in about some of their lost deals too. It was surprising to see what buyers and sellers would walk away from. I put it out to my Facebook friends and got some wild responses.

One person lost a deal over a pool table when the seller was moving out of province anyhow. Another lost over a broken snow blower. Apparently the seller promised it to a nephew and buyer walked without it. Other inconsequential items included a fridge, a $100 microwave, a bookshelf, drapes and a flowering shrub in the garden. Of course it isn’t always about possessions. Sometimes it’s a technicality. I heard from one friend who had a deal fall apart because the age of the home was reported as 14 years old when it was actually 18 years old, while another deal died over a 6 month discrepancy in the age of the furnace. Another fell apart when the seller signed back an offer to close on the same date that was the anniversary of a death of a family member and was taken as a sign that this “wasn’t meant to be”.

Often the argument is just an ego thing where the buyer and seller just don’t like each other and dig their heels in but other times it is the telltale sign of something larger. Our job is diffuse the anger and turn it into a positive. Here is my example; Once I went on a listing presentation on a condo. The exact same unit on the floor directly below sold for $365k. I suggested to the seller that if we listed at $369k we might do a little better (being one floor up). The owner was insistent on listing at $379k so I thought, sure why not. It’s not wildly off base. After a few weeks we got an offer for $375k so being already $10k ahead I pressed my seller to accept. She wouldn’t. Insisted on the full $379k. We couldn’t make the deal work and the seller walked. So clearly my seller lost on a great opportunity….or did she? About a month later the seller listed with someone else at $379k and the condo sold way over in multiple offers. In effect, it turns out the original buyer lost. There is a lesson in here somewhere.

Clearly buying or selling a home is an emotional experience. Both sellers and buyers think they hold all the cards. Getting them together is the real trick. If you hit this critical impasse the first thing to do is isolate it. Is this a buyer getting cold feet or a seller who’s just not ready to let go? Knowing the true motivation will help resolve the issues. Sometimes however, people are just stubborn jerks. Other times you step up and buy them a new microwave. In the end, the buyer and the seller just want to know that someone cares. Finally, I heard from one friend who tells it like it is. His client was his wife. Many years ago she dug her heels in when there was only a $200 difference between her and the seller. The agent husband managed to get the deal together and it has been their matrimonial house for 20 years. He loves to tell the story about how she almost let the deal die over $200. Hilarious.

mark mclean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office and President-Elect for the Toronto Real Estate Board. The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB or Bosley RE.

26
Jan

List High To Double End? That’s An Interesting Strategy.

stubborn
Let me first say right off the bat, that I have no way of knowing if this was the intended strategy, but in Mastermind last week we heard from an agent who showed a house that, by his own estimation, was a bit over-priced. His clients really liked it but they were $50k apart. The listing agent was quite adamant about the price and said that the owner had no interest in negotiating. Our agent said his clients were prepared to play the waiting game. Give it a month, the home was sure to get reduced. But than it sold…the listing agent double ended it….at a price closer to where my agent’s clients were thinking.

The story highlighted our discussion on pricing to get listings. It planted a seed in our minds that maybe, just maybe, an agent would give a price that was on the higher side of the CMA scale in order to get the listing. Well certainly that is well within the realm of possibilities. I mean if you bring in three agents to price your house, and one gives you a price $50K more than the other two, wouldn’t you at least consider going with the higher number? It’s called buying the listing. And while it’s probably not the best marketing strategy, it does put your face on a sign. Of course the other side of the story is that the owner has unrealistic expectations but an agent takes the listing anyway. There are enough stories out there about walking away from overpriced homes but that is probably a discussion for another day.

Then the penny dropped. What if the intent was to eliminate all other buyer agents and then just wait for the call? You know…the one from the person who saw it on Realtor.ca and who’s plan is to only work with the listing agent to score a better deal? Again, I’m thinking to myself, “no, it can’t be. It’s way to risky”. But here’s the thing. There are lots of people out there who believe that working with the listing agent is the best way to win a listing in multiple offers AND get the home at the best price. So I suppose it is conceivable. Sometimes agents agree to drop commissions if they double end (bring in their own buyer) but it is a dangerous tactic for ANY realtor. So many things can go wrong. At the end of the day, representing two people (a buyer and a seller) is actually double the work. Everyone should know that going in.

I still believe that pricing is, in many ways, an art. It’s not just looking at what the neighbour’s house sold for (although that factors into it). There are hundreds of minute details that determine price. It’s something that can’t be learned in a day. My advice…stay on top of the market, wow Seller’s with your knowledge, marketing genius, and sales prowess.

mark mclean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office and President-Elect for the Toronto Real Estate Board. The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB or Bosley RE.

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