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Posts tagged ‘multiple offers’

24
Feb

Lost that offer by $1000. Here’s the perfect comeback.

i-winHere is my tip of the day. We’ve all been on multiple offers. Sometimes we win, sometimes we lose. In the losing category there are different levels of loss, but one of the most painful is the loss by a few thousand dollars. Ouch. Simply speaking, these types of loses tell you one undeniable fact….You know what you are doing! You have done your research, you know the comparable properties in the neighbourhood, you know the homes strengths and weaknesses, and have pinpointed the value…almost. Conversely, don’t let getting blown out of the water make you crazy. Losing by $50k or more, while painful, sends a much different message. It could be read as…not educating or preparing your buyer, not understanding the neighbourhood or market, or simply not reading the signals given off by the facts (number of offers for instance). There is one other thing to consider…Sometimes it just happens because you just never know what the motivation is of the winning bidder. They may have lost out a few times before and are willing to just throw everything, including the kitchen sink, at the next house.

There is no question that the GTA market has its challenges. The media has thrown a lot of coverage on the fact that there is a supply issue and with demand at peak levels, the simple economic rules of supply and demand prevail. Consider the latest news of over 80 offers on a home in Brampton. The truth is that the biggest bag of money wins 99 out of a 100 times. To increase your odds when you don’t have the most money check out my tips for increasing your chances here. For those that lose out it is important to have a comprehensive debrief of the bid with your clients the next day. Stay positive, share what you’ve learned and then move on to the next one.

Awhile ago I wrote a post about having to lose a few in order to build trust with your buyer. Many agents in my office have experienced this from time to time. Agents who are dealing with first time buyers are more susceptible to this phenomenon because those buyers are a little more concerned with paying too much or getting financing. They are still finding their footing. The process of educating the buyer might take several weeks, even months. You may have to look at a lot of homes too so keep a record of what they have seen and let them know what they sold for. It is important to point out some things about each house and make notes about what they liked and didn’t like because after a while all houses will start to look the same. At the end of the day, your perfect comeback is, “hey, we know what we are doing”.

Mark McLean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real estate Association. The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE.

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8
Feb

Market conditions stressing out local Realtors too

hair-pullAs a manager for a busy downtown Toronto real estate office, I never thought I would be spending my time talking agents off the edge of a cliff. The truth is, that the market is breaking new ground on agent management. In the past, my conversations with fellow agents revolved around helping them write clauses, dealing with complaints, running meetings, being a liaison with front desk workers, reviewing advertising and generally ensure their business was running smoothly. Today I’m still doing those tasks but as an unfortunate byproduct of this market, I find myself spending a lot of time comforting agents, offering condolences and talking through the ‘post offer’ game tapes. Don’t get me wrong, these are great conversations, but I worry about an office full of stressed out and exhausted agents.
Now, you might be thinking…boo hoo, poor agents, they make so much money it’s hard to have any sympathy. The reality is that the buying process is seriously intense these days. Frustration levels amongst agents are extremely high. They are missing out on offers on both condos and houses and our office meetings and masterminds are dominated by countless stories of failed offer attempts despite clients throwing everything they have at a property.
The problems of low supply, as reported in the media, are not limited to the downtown core either. This is a Golden Horseshoe problem, from Hamilton to Ajax and as far north as Barrie. Granted, the supply crisis is highest in the 416. For several years I have been tracking the weekly sales of houses and condos in the downtown market, defined by the area between the 401 and the lake and east to include the Beaches and west to include High Park. Over the years I have watched the general trend of tightened supply in both houses and condos as well as an increase in the percentage of properties selling over the list price. While housing has stayed relatively consistent, only edging up slowly, the condo market has often surprised me. When I first started tracking sales, there was only true competition on about 13-15% of units sold. That percentage was pretty stable for a few years. Then the number started to shift. By mid year 2016 I started to see more units selling at or above the list price. By June we started to see 30%, by October we were testing out 40% and by December we were seeing some numbers in the 50% range. Imagine, half of all condos selling above the list price. In January 2017 new records were set. Last week we hit 65% and when I am reviewing each and every listing on a line by line basis I notice that condos are not selling over the list price by a $5-10,000 like a few years ago, they are selling over the list price by $50-100K now. It is an extraordinary phenomenon.
Freehold homes face the same challenges for buyers. Recently a home in the west end, listed at $799K sold for $999k then, less than a month later a similar home sold for over $1.2M. Everything in an agent’s gut says these houses are worth the same money. So imagine what is happening to those clients who are being told to submit their offer based on a recent sale, only to get completely blown out of the water.
What impact, if any, is filtering down to the agent on the street? Productive agents are feeling the pressure as much as new agents entering the real estate field. I personally find myself spending as much time coaching the newbie agent the art of increasing your odds at the offer table as talking to the experienced agent who is frustrated with market conditions and looking for answers. And it’s not just the shear number of buyers looking for homes that is creating high stress levels. Increased scrutiny by the banks on their borrowers (sometimes insisting on conditional financing clauses), appraisals and quick home inspections are severely complicating the buying process. Are there any quick fixes? Nothing seems evident on the horizon and my impression is that as the spring market approaches it is going to be a whole lot harder before it gets easier.
Mark McLean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real estate Association. The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE.

20
Dec

Agent Wants to Know If You Had Any Offers On Your Listing?

whisperingHow much are you willing to say about a previously turned down offer on one of your listings? This was the topic of last week’s Mastermind meeting at our office and it created considerable debate. Here is the scenario…. You have a listing that has been around for nearly two months. In that time you have entertained two offers. The first one came on offer night but it was much lower than the Seller’s expectations. Just after the third week, you terminated the listing and relisted it at a higher price. (This tactic has limited success but, depending on the time of year and a bunch of other factors, can help sell the property). Within days you received your second offer which was lower that the first offer. Now you are cruising in on month two. You are still getting lots of showings and agents are asking questions…why hasn’t it sold? have you been getting interest? AND… have you received any offers so far?

We had a rather entertaining debate at the office and on the local real estate Facebook group. One thread suggested that the listing agent has a duty, according to REBBA 2002, to say absolutely nothing. I find the logic incorrect on this. While our duty is to inform agents about the number of competing offers we are bound to keep the contents of competing offers confidential, but once an offer is rejected and expired, is it still our responsibility to keep the contents private? If you agree with that logic than you would have to agree that an expired offer is still, technically, an offer. I don’t believe that is the case. Plus I find it hard to imagine an agent responding to my question about other offers by saying “I can’t tell you”. In my mind that is a loaded response that immediately puts any possibility of a new offer off the table.

Another thread suggested that it was okay to divulge certain information about expired offers, such as price and terms (like conditions or closing dates) provided the Seller has given his permission. Generally this is not a bad answer but I don’t think it ticks all the boxes either. Essentially it suggests that the Seller is directing the listing agent to say something like “the Seller is hoping to get $1M and the last offer was only for $850k”. Clearly the agent is acting on the direction of the Seller but is he advancing his listing in any way?

While I recognize that we work under a strict code of ethics and the law, I believe there are a number of responses that work without implicating your Seller in a position of greed or being unrealistic. “We had two offers. One came really quickly and wasn’t what we were looking for, and the other had some conditions that the Seller was uneasy with” or how about “we were back and forth but in the end the parties just couldn’t come to an agreement”. and end the conversation with “we are still getting plenty of showings and traffic is high at open houses”. No lies, no disparaging comments. Simple truths. What you don’t want to say are things like “The offers didn’t meet my clients expectations” or “both offers were below market value” or “my clients expectations are too high” or ” my client is looking for $X (even if directed by your client to say so)”.

I am reminded about the saying that a good agent will say more by not saying. That’s a valuable lesson to be learned. I believe it is alright to say that you had two offers, but, if pressed about the contents it is okay to be vague. Don’t fall into the trap of saying too much especially if you are asked about price. Simply direct the potential agent to do their own research on comparable solds in the area and let them determine value. 20 years ago our market was much different. Properties stayed on the market for months so naturally agents would ask about previous offers and yes, we would speak the truth. There was true kitchen table negotiating with candid discussions while not giving away too many details. My advise, strike a balance between saying something and not saying anything. That may sound strange but the reality is that human nature should be your guide. People want what others have or want. If you say that there has been interest and offers then potential buyers want in on that action.

Mark McLean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real estate Association . The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE

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