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Posts tagged ‘seo’

2
Feb

Too good not to post.

zero-talent

Think you don’t have what it takes to be an awesome Realtor? Here are ten things that escape many agents I have worked with in the past. Not only do these ten points require no real talent, they are also free. So really there is no sense spending money on SEO if you can’t deliver on most (or all) of the traits on the list. Boom!

Thanks @sethprice for sharing

Mark McLean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real Estate Association. The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE.

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17
Jan

Can You Automate Your Real Estate Business?

Osaka Tin Toy Institute – Tin Age Collection – Robby the Robot with Blaster – Front

Osaka Tin Toy Institute – Tin Age Collection – Robby the Robot with Blaster – Front

This week’s meeting topic was pretty straightforward. I was curious to know how many functions of our business could be automated. Were there any functions that you could assign and, essentially, forget about and were those functions important to our business? I taped up three boards to the wall marked; Completely Automated, 1-3 Touch Automated and Not Automated.

Category 1. The completely automated category are those that you would consider “set-and-go” type functions. One you set them up they pretty much look after themselves. For instance, you might opt to outsource your social media posts through services like City Blast. There are also newsletter companies that create content and mail out a set number of newsletters to your farm area each month. Many website companies will keep your site current with timely articles and IDX or Vow feeds can keep your site current. You can even find services to do email drip campaigns, Facebook ads and SEO. Additionally, your brokerage might have its own lead generating system that you participate in or online surveys to provide feedback on your services.

Category 2. The next category is the 1 to 3 touch automated. It is slightly more complicated than the fully automated category because its success relies on you either entering data or pushing a few buttons to make things happen. Unlike fully automatic functions you will need to spend some time at a device, like a computer, iPad or smart phone. There will be some data to enter either in your CRM system or perhaps just setting up a prospect match. If you have done the templates ahead of time then just listed or just sold cards fall into this category. For the busy agent there are a number of touch point services to help you build connections with potential clients like sending thank you cards from your phone or choosing closing gifts and depending on your skill level you could incorporate automated email response systems.

Category 3. Finally there is the not automated category. These are functions like home showings, putting offers together and negotiating deals, door knocking, open houses, writing blogs and doing research. To accomplish anything in this category you need to be fully invested in the real estate business. There is little chance that over the near future these tasks could be performed by an automated source.

The truth is that real estate is a business that requires a great deal of attention from many different directions. At the heart of it is relationship building, networking, and staying top of mind with the people in your network. While some of those functions can be completely or almost completely automated to be a standout success you must have boots on the ground. It is important to note that neither category 1 and 2 can work in silos without input from category 3, yet category 3 can function without 1 and 2. Also interesting is the costs associated with each function. Category 1 relies the most on outsourcing the jobs and is therefore the most expensive, while category 3 is the least expensive but the most time-consuming.

Mark McLean is the Broker/Manager at the Bosley Real Estate Queen St W office, the Immediate Past President the Toronto Real Estate Board and a director at the Ontario Real estate Association .The opinions expressed here do not reflect the opinions of TREB, OREA or Bosley RE.

13
Feb

Steal This Meeting. Effort vs Impact

meeting feb v2

I would be the first to admit that some of my Tuesday meetings are a complete flop. When you factor in holidays, summer schedules, sick days and bad weather, I conduct about 40 meetings a year at the Bosley Real Estate Queen West office. I will admit that a few of them are pretty bad. Once I had no idea what I was going to talk about so I hired a magician. I told the agents that he was an internationally acclaimed real estate speaker. I had them believing that for about 2 minutes. But at least we had a blast. Some meetings, like this one….well, I feel like I can put it in the “win” column.
This week’s meeting was all about figuring out where to spend your marketing money. When I do yearly reviews I always ask the question…What are you spending money on? What’s working? What’s not? I got this idea to create a visual representation from the Agent Reboot Conference I recently attended in NYC. First, I drew a chart. The horizontal line represented the effort from easy and cheap to expensive and hard. The Vertical line represented the impact your idea would have from little impact at the bottom to high impact at the top. Then we started naming off things we spend our money on and placed them on the chart in the appropriate spot. It’s a bit arbitrary because something like a PR campaign might be really easy and inexpensive for one agent and the complete opposite for others so I asked the person with the idea to figure out where to place the dot. Ultimately we came up with 30 things. If we had more time I’m sure we could have come up with another 30. What I hoped would happen was that a group of things would emerge as being inexpensive and high impact…and thankfully that’s what I got. Whew.

Later I was thinking that this would be a good exercise for individual agents to do since they all have different skill sets. What do you think? Are there any other things you would add to the list that I missed? Where would you place them?

I’m not sure if it is just my rambunctious crowd but when we do exercises like this they often lead to some interesting remarks and hilarity so, to all the managers out there, have some fun with this one.

mark mclean

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